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God’s Grandeur

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The poem God’s Grandeur is an Italian sonnet. The poem has fourteen lines split into a sestet and an octave. Furthermore, these sestet and octave are detached by a change in the confrontational course of the piece. The approach adopted in this poem is not the renowned one that Hopkins is so famous for, sprung rhythm, but it differs to some extent from conformist sonnet.

This poem is written by Gerard Manley Hopkins. In this piece of writing, the poet articulates that although people constantly obliterate what God has endowed them with and shun away, His magnificence and splendor continues to present himself to man in the wake of every new day. In the poem, the poet utilizes a number of alliterations, sprung rhythm, and images as poetic devices to communicate the message to the reader. The poem adopts a sestet (6 lines), an octave (8 line), and 14 lines with end rhymes format.

The opening lines of the eight-line stanza of the poem provide a description of an ordinary world whereby God’s existence surges like an electric current which is for a short time evident in flares similar to refracted shiny light emanating from a rumpled foil. Again, the poet claims that God’s presence is also like rich oil. With this concrete proof of God’s presence, the poet asks why humans fall short of heeding “reck” God’s celestial power “His rod”.

The next four lines of the eight-line stanza of the poem describe the situation of modern human life. The poet represents the landscape as if it reflects God as the ultimate creator. However, this vision of the landscape is not upheld by man since he prioritizes the industry and the economy over the landscape. The poet goes ahead to say that the shos that people put on severe the link between the earth and one’s feet thus denoting the mounting spiritual isolation from the nature. The concluding six lines of Hopkins’ poem show the spiritual alienation from the nature, but nature persists to present spiritual guides.

The poem commences with the metaphor of God’s opulence as an electric current. The electric current ends up being visible for a short through flashes. These flashes may depict something treacherous or brilliant. Bringing out the notion of brilliance in the flashes, the author compares it with the optical effect of rumpled foil. The representation of oil being squeezed out of olive depicts a different form of prosperity. This richness of oil wells up and finally ends in a decent run-off. The use of electricity as an image is repeated in the fourth line. In this line, it is represented as God’s rod, whereby His punishing power reminds the reader of a lightning rod with electricity flaring out in the atmosphere. The poet adopts this complex image to reveal the connection between the methodical and the worldly to religious tradition, mystery, and spirituality. During the poet’s era, electricity was an area of scientific interest. Electricity had long been linked with divine power, but scientists were now clarifying it in normal terms. Hopkins is insolently positive in his claim that God’s doings remain evident in nature. He argues that man will only see it if he is keen and spiritual enough.

In his claim of God’s supremacy, Hopkins includes innovations and inventions of modern science claiming that it acted as more evidence of God’s magnificence. The poem shows that the poet is amazed by the visual impression of a rumpled foil, which is a manmade object. Furthermore, the poet uses the imagee of olive oil in the poem. Olive oil is considered to be a reparation commodity; it was utilized as medicine, food, and for other religious functions. Thus, the olive oil conventionally emerges in every phase of one’s life as much as God fills all divisions of the universe. Additionally, the tardiness of the olive oil oozing differs from the swift electric flash. It implies that the means of extraction of olive oil involve eminence such as faith and patience. Generally, the use of image of olive oil and foil paints a picture of the existence of an opulence and divine presence which is evident through drops of olive or flashing glints.

The poet uses the fourth line to hub his readers on the current chronological instance. He assists the reader in developing the reason behind as to why men do not fear God anymore. Hopkins lays stress on “now” presently. The next four lines in the eight-line stanza show a reflection of the way human culture has neglected God. This picture is depicted through the act of man presently neglecting nature. Although the poet focuses on the present, he includes that preceding generations are partly to be held responsible. However, the closing six lines assert that although man and nature have experienced corrosion in mutual dependency, God still loves them both. God’s never-ending supremacy of regeneration has been evident in both man’s and nature’s favor. 

I think that the poem reveals the poet’s certainty that the world resembles a book whose author is God. He ascertains that any individual who is keen and spiritual enough can certainly become aware of the signs of compassionate authorship. The realization of this benevolent authorship will help amend man’s consideration of this ultimate author who is our living God.

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