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The Red Room

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Despite the fact that the story was somehow fictitious, it depicted a realistic scenario of a unique Red Room that served as a prison where some of the characters were locked as the fight precipitated. Therefore, this essay presents an analysis of the setting of chapter 2 of Jane Eyre.

Inclusion of Particular Details 

In chapter two of the novel, the author included particular details of the room since she had first hand information about its setting since she was locked inside the mansion for sometimes. Therefore, she got accurate information about the interior of the room. She noted that the mansion was a good and one of the biggest room in that area, though it was almost deserted. The reason for desertion culminated from the fear that Uncle Reed actually died from this room. Since it was not put to active use, the author could see empty spaces that depicted under utilization of the facility.    

Placement of the Characters

The reason for placing the characters in the mountains or near the ocean was aimed at strategically positioning them strategically due to her superstitious belief about the environment at that time. The other reason was that the author was not satisfied, thus continued contemplating. To her, the oom was like a death chamber and could not host the characters, neither could they be comfortable there. In essence, the mountain and/or the oceans provided a better alternative for most of the characters.

Stormy Weather During the Fight

A careful analysis of the story reveals that the stranger was a vampire, and the ensured fight  was a sign of quest for domination. In this regard, the weather became stormy when those characters were fighting to show the struggle for domination of the area. None of the camps could give up the fight since it would be overpowered by the opposing camp. The stormy impression of the fight was a symbol of the fierce battle between the two antagonistic camps. This was a fight for supremacy, meaning that several people died from the encounter, a situation that was intended to give rise to a new way of life among the people in that area.

Although the confrontation was a consequential act against discomfort among the people who lived in the area, it created anxiety among the locals. The fight was also seen as a revolt against Mr. Reeds’ decision to get married, but amid the excitement, he meets opposition from the other people who resided in the area. In the story, Jane’s resistance to the people who wanted to abduct her also contributed to the uniqueness of the wweather. This was symbolic, though obvious that she was resisting oppression that the people were undergoing. 

Mysterious Stranger

Obviously, the author depicted the stranger as a fierce person with very unique and frightening characters. Therefore, while hiding his monstrous outlook, the mysterious stranger rather chose to always appear at midnight as opposed to storming the area at daytime. His daytime presence could create anxiety on each opposing camp. In addition, the mysterious stranger in the story depicted unknown powers that propelled both camps to continue fighting. At night, the monster could not easily detected, thus making it suitable for him to provide an extra force during the confrontation.

Conclusion

The story was crafted in a manner to present an ethnocentric relationship between darkness and what was believed to be foreign. Here, the foreign aspect was monstrous and depicted a magical culture of the people. The use of color also prominently symbolized the setting of the scene since the house in which Jane was locked had been painted red. Finally, the sad mood was created by the fierce confrontation between the people who lived in that area, but it was enhanced by the extra force that the mysterious stranger added when it appeared at night.

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